Tuesday, January 08, 2008

Mystery Book Review: Blood of the Wicked by Leighton Gage

Mysterious ReviewsMysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, has written a review of Blood of the Wicked by Leighton Gage. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Blood of the Wicked by Leighton GageBuy from Amazon.com
Blood of the Wicked by
A Chief Inspector Mario Silva Investigation

Soho Crime (Hardcover)
ISBN-10: 1-56947-470-2 (1569474702)
ISBN-13: 978-1-56947-470-9 (9781569474709)
Publication Date: January 2008
List Price: $24.00

Synopsis (from the publisher): In the remote Brazilian town of Cascatas do Pontal, where landless peasants are confronting the owners of vast estates, the the bishop arrives by helicopter to consecrate a new church and is assassinated.

Mario Silva, Chief Inspector for Criminal Matters of the Federal Police of Brazil, is dispatched to the interior to find the killer. The Pope himself has called Brazil’s president; the pressure is on Silva to perform. Assisted by his nephew, Hector Costa, also a federal policeman, Silva must battle the state police and a corrupt judiciary as well as criminals who prey on street kids, the warring factions of the Landless League, the big landowners and the Church itself, in order to solve the initial murder and several brutal killings that follow. Justice is hard to come by. An old priest, a secret liberation theologist, finally metes it out.

Review: Leighton Gage's debut novel, Blood of the Wicked, is a compelling mystery set in modern Brazil amid the conflict between the few large land owners and the many landless in the country.

Mario Silva, the Chief Inspector for Criminal Matters of the Federal Police, is sent to a remote village in Brazil to investigate the murder of a prominent bishop who was there to bless the opening of a new church. The murder may have political overtones: the bishop had taken a hard line against liberation theologians, members of the Catholic Church who were involved in the struggle for economic and political justice - which in Brazil meant the ongoing, and often violent, dispute over redistribution of idle land from the wealthy land owners to the landless poor. Upon arrival, Silva finds himself at odds with almost everyone, from the police department to the parish priests to the local residents, both rich and poor, who consider him an outsider. But Silva, together with his nephew Hector Costa, is determined to discover what secrets lie beneath the surface of this volatile region.

There are many reasons to recommend Blood of the Wicked. The principal characters, Mario Silva and Hector Costa, are fully developed with conflicted backgrounds that serve them well in their current positions as Federal officials. The writing is first rate, descriptive and atmospheric. The primary plot is multi-dimensional, complex and intricate, yet surprisingly easy to follow, no small accomplishment for a book with a strong and varied cast of secondary characters, each participating in intersecting subplots.

Yet there are a few disturbing aspects as well. The body count numbers well into the double digits which seems excessive, even for the brutal environment Silva finds himself in. Some of the deaths seem unnecessary, almost gratuitous, and do not advance the plot in any meaningful way. More troublesome is the motive for the bishop's murder. The author could have taken any one of several different and credible directions to account for the killing, possibly opting for something daring and different, yet in the end chose the safest approach which in this case was also the most predictable and most disappointing (and least interesting).

On balance, however, Blood of the Wicked is a terrific mystery, a strongly written and powerful novel that will be remembered long after the final pages are read.

Special thanks to Soho Crime for providing a copy of Blood of the Wicked for this review.

Review Copyright © 2008 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved.

For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Monday, January 07, 2008

Compendium of Mystery News 080107

A compendium of recently published mystery news articles:

• Otto Penzler offers up another Mysterious Quiz in his column on NYSun.com.

Soho Press will expand its presence in the mystery field with the addition of a new imprint, Soho Constable, which will publish mysteries originated in England by Constable Robinson. Soho Crime, another Soho Press imprint, is devoted to contemporaneous mystery series set in exotic locations.

• The 4th made-for-television movie in the Jesse Stone series, Sea Change, will be released on DVD on February 24, 2008. Tom Selleck plays Jesse Stone. (MBN note: will update its page as soon as DVD cover art for Sea Change is available.) For more information on the Jesse Stone character, visit our .

• Bestselling mystery author (real name John Camp) leaves this weekend for two weeks as an embedded reporter with the Minnesota National Guard in Iraq. John Camp won a Pulitzer Prize as a reporter with the Twin Cities Pioneer Press.

• Eils Lotozo (for the Philadelphia Inquirer) interviews mystery writer , author of the Home Repair is Homicide series featuring Jacobia "Jake" Tiptree. Graves' most recent mystery in the series is The Book of Old Houses.

, our website that lists mystery movies available on Blu-ray and HD DVD discs, was updated this past week with new titles being released this month. In related news, Reuters is reporting that Warner Bros Studios, which had been releasing movies in both formats, has decided to move forward exclusively with Blu-ray. Of the 7 major Hollywood studios, only Paramount and NBC Universal now support HD DVD.

• Tod Caviness (for the Orlando Sentinel) spends 30 Seconds with .

• The Associated Press is reporting that PBS Masterpiece Theatre is getting an update, splitting into three seasons. The summer season, to be titled Masterpiece Mystery!, will take over the current Mystery! series on PBS.

• The final season of Foyle's War debuted last night on ITV1 with the episode titled Plan of Attack. Three episodes are planned for this season, the DVD of which should be available this summer. See to purchase previous seasons of this outstanding series. For more information about the series, visit our .

Please visit the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books where we are committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Mysteries on TV: Lovejoy, MI-5, Tropical Heat, and An Unsuitable Job for a Woman

Mysteries on TV

Four new DVD sets of mystery and suspense television series are being released this week.

Lovejoy: Season 2

Ian McShane starred as an antiques dealer and part-time detective in , a series produced by the BBC that comprised 69 episodes over 6 seasons.

The second season consisted of 11 episodes (including a 2-part concluding episode) that aired from January through March 1991. Also included on this 3 disc set are two interviews with McShane, one conducted specifically for this DVD release and a second from a 1991 talk show.

MI-% (Spooks): Volume 5

Another series from the UK, one that remains in production today, is Spooks which is titled in the US. The series has a large ensemble cast (which changes on a regular basis) that portray agents of the British intelligence agency who are responsible for protecting national security.

The fifth volume in this series is being released on 5 discs and consists of 10 episodes that aired on BBC from September through November 2006.

Tropical Heat: The Complete Series

aired on CBS as part of an experiment to add series television following the late night talk shows ("Crimetime after "Primetime"). The series starred Rob Stewart as Nick Slaughter who moves to south Florida to start a detective agency. Carolyn Dunn starred as local travel agent Sylvie Gerard who becomes his partner.

CBS aired 66 episodes over 3 seasons from April 1991 through October 1993, all of which are included on this 9 disc complete series DVD set.

An Unsuitable Job for a Woman: Series 1 and 2

Though best known for her (of which many of the mysteries were filmed as made-for-television movies), also wrote two books featuring Cordelia Gray, a woman who inherits a detective agency from her partner. ITV1 adapted these books into the series starring Helex Baxendale as Cordelia Gray.

Series 1 and 2 consisted of 2 3-part movies that aired in 1997 and 1998 and are included on this 4 disc set.

Visit the Mysteries on TV website to discover more currently available on DVD.

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Mystery Godoku Puzzle for January 07, 2008

Mystery GodokuMystery Godoku Puzzle for January 07, 2008A new has been created by the editors of the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books and is now available on our website.

Godoku is similar to Sudoku, but uses letters instead of numbers. To give you a headstart, we provide you a mystery clue to fill in a complete row or column (if you choose to use it!).

This week's letters and mystery clue: G H I M N S T U Y. He is the author of several horror thrillers including Blackout and The Cadaver (9 letters).

New! We now have our puzzles in PDF format for easier printing. Print this week's puzzle here.

Previous puzzles are stored in the Mystery Godoku Archives.

Enjoy the weekly Mystery Godoku Puzzle from the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, and Thanks for visiting our website!

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Mystery Book Review: Missing Persons 101 by Heath P. Boice

Mysterious ReviewsMysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, has written a review of Missing Persons 101 by Heath P. Boice. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Missing Persons 101 by Heath P. BoiceBuy from Amazon.com
Missing Persons 101 by
The Mystery 101 Series with Doug Carter-Conners

Windstorm Creative (Trade paperback)
ISBN-10: 1-59092-655-2 (1590926552)
ISBN-13: 978-1-59092-655-0 (9781590926550)
Publication Date: August 2007
List Price: $14.99

Synopsis (from the publisher): Welcome to Westmire Shores, a quirky college town on the seashore. It’s a town where odd happenings are commonplace, including murder. Dr. Doug Carter-Conners, Dean of Students at Westmire College, has uncovered the town’s latest strange event … the disappearance of one of his students. Join “Dean Doug” as he searches for Jessica Philmore, while racing his way through rituals of witchcraft, student protests, carnival rides, and even death.

Review: Heath P. Boice introduces Dr. Doug Carter-Conners, Dean of Students of a small college on the New Jersey shore, in Missing Persons 101, the first book in the academically themed Mystery 101 series.

When a student, Jessica Philmore, the daughter of a wealthy family, disappears, Dean Doug (as he prefers to be called) is under tremendous pressure to find her before negative press begins to affect the college. But the information available to him doesn't make sense. The missing girl's roommate, a practicing witch, says she is her best friend but then claims to be responsible for her disappearance. Jessica's boyfriend states he's in love with her, but seems strangely unconcerned that she's gone. Even Jessica's mother, who is all but hysterical upon arriving at the college demanding action, suddenly vanishes without a word to anyone. A chance encounter with a fortune-telling gypsy at a local fairground suggests Jessica's disappearance may not be what it seems on the surface, leading Dean Doug to look in another direction, one that may cost him his life.

Missing Persons 101 is a pleasant mystery that won't tax the reader's intellect too greatly. Dean Doug, who is far too politically correct (which no doubt is a prerequisite for working at an institution of higher learning in the US these days) and who comes off as something of a wimp, is in many ways less interesting than the more richly drawn secondary characters. This is actually an important consideration for a series: if the supporting players aren't sufficiently well rounded, it's hard to sustain long term interest in the main character. The missing persons plot is well thought out, but rather weakly executed. Dean Doug happens to be in the right place at the right time to pick up all the important clues giving the impression that he is stumbling through his amateur investigation rather than reasoning through it. And the red herrings, such as the dead student who washes up on the shore, are too quickly discarded as irelevant to the case leaving little suspense in the end.

As the first book in a series, Missing Persons 101 does a good job of introducing the characters and setting. Maybe future cases will provide more of a challenge for Dean Doug than the one presented here.

Special thanks to Windstorm Creative for providing a copy of Missing Persons 101 for this review.

Review Copyright © 2008 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved.

For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Saturday, January 05, 2008

Mystery Book Review: Death of a Dutchman by Magdalen Nabb

Mysterious ReviewsMysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, has written a review of Death of a Dutchman by Magdalen Nabb. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Death of a Dutchman by Magdalen NabbBuy from Amazon.com
Death of a Dutchman by
A Marshal Guarnaccia Investigation

Soho Crime (Trade Paperback)
ISBN-10: 1-56947-482-6 (1569474826)
ISBN-13: 978-1-56947-482-2 (9781569474822)
Publication Date: December 2007
List Price: $12.00

Synopsis (from the publisher): Summoned by an aged woman to investigate mysterious noises in the vacant flat next to hers, Marshal Guarnaccia discovers a dying Dutch jeweler. The old lady had known him when he was a boy growing up in Florence. Could he have returned to the family home just to commit suicide? Or could the man be the victim of a cunning murderer?

Review: The late Madgalen Nabb's Marshal Guarnaccia mysteries are being reissued by Soho Crime. The second in the series, Death of a Dutchman, was originally published in 1983.

The Marshal is visiting an old woman as part of his rounds, patiently listening to her stories, when she remarks that she has heard noises from an adjoining apartment, one presumed vacant. Upon knocking at the door, he hears water running, breaks in and discovers the tenant, a jeweler from The Netherlands, near death. Although help is summoned immediately, the man dies, but not before uttering "It wasn't her." Though the officials in the case are convinced the cause of death to be a suicide, The Marshal isn't sure and conducts a quiet, but urgent, investigation to determine who might have wanted to kill him before his superiors close the book on the case.

Though Death of a Dutchman was written before computers and cell phones and when travel between countries in Europe was far more complicated than it is today, it bears the timeless quality of a good police procedural in which everything one needs to know is determined by asking pertinent questions and listening to what people say. The Marshal suspects something is awry here, and uses gentle persuasion with the young Lieutenant responsible for the investigation to get permission to continue to work on it. The relationships that the Marshal has with his co-workers, his family, and the people in his neighborhood, are quite endearing. When one of the men in his station is inadvertently killed, the Marshal is devastated. The personal approach he takes to everyone and everything is one of the aspects of the book that make it so special.

The case is reasonably complicated and somewhat dependent on idiosyncrasies of Italian law that may be unfamiliar to non-Italians, but that doesn't lessen the appeal of how Marshal Guarnaccia goes about piecing together the life of the Dutchman and the reasons someone may have wanted him dead. The conclusion, whether or not the one person the Marshal suspects of the crime gets away before the official paperwork is sealed, is really quite thrilling.

Soho Crime is to be commended for reissuing and promoting the early books in this series. They deserve a new audience of readers.

Special thanks to Soho Crime for providing an a copy of Death of a Dutchman for this review.

Review Copyright © 2008 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved.

For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Compendium of Mystery News 080105

After a brief break for the holidays, we resume our compendium of recently published mystery news articles (for the period 12/15/2007 to 12/31/2007):

has teamed up with Oberon Media to create a series of casual games based on the Women's Murder Club franchise and release them via its extensive network of multi-platform distribution partnerships worldwide.

NBC is planning on airing episodes of and on Sundays beginning this March. The new seasons for these series begin this month on USA (which is owned by NBC). NBC had already announced it was bringing back which has been airing new episodes on USA.

• Scholastic (US publisher of the Harry Potter books) has announced it is introducing a new series of 10 books called The 39 Clues, mystery novels aimed at readers 8 to 12. The series is about the Cahills, a century-year-old family who are supposed to be the world's most powerful clan. The first book in the series, The Maze of Bones by Rick Riordan, is scheduled for publication in September 2008.

• Otto Penzler (on NYSun.com) chooses his favorite mystery of 2007: The Tin Roof Blowdown by . In another column, he lists 10 mysteries that should be required reading for aficionados of the genre.

MacGameStore.com announced the release of Venice Mystery in which players must solve an ancient mystery before Venice sinks into the water.

• The intellectual inspiration for 's novels featuring Kay Scarpetta, Dr. Marcella Fierro, is stepping down from her position as Virginia's Chief Medical Examiner.

answers the three questions she most often receives during a book signing in Oline H. Cogdill's column (on South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com)

• The 5-minute interview with mystery writer (on The Independent).

Please visit the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books where we are committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Friday, January 04, 2008

Mystery Book Review: Brother's Keeper by Steven Owad

Mysterious ReviewsMysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, has written a review of Brother's Keeper by Steven Owad. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Brother's Keeper by Steven OwadBuy from Amazon.com
Brother's Keeper by Steven Owad
Non-series

RendezVous Crime (Trade Paperback)
ISBN-10: 1-894917-59-6 (1894917596)
ISBN-13: 978-1-894917-59-9 (9781894917599)
Publication Date: October 2007
List Price: $13.95

Synopsis (from the publisher): Vince Maguire has spent the last decade as a journalist in Warsaw. A club-hopping dance addict, he isn't big on self-awareness. The ease ends when the dark world of his estranged brother intrudes. Teddy has fallen in with criminals who are trying to kill American oil executives in Warsaw. Vince finds himself framed for an attempted hit. While evading the Polish cops and seeking leads to Teddy's whereabouts, it strikes him that his lost relationship with Teddy is only one aspect of a greater loss. How did he get to a point where his dreams no longer mattered? How did Teddy get to a point where his "friends" could kill without hesitation? The answers appear to lie in the frozen oilfields of northern Alberta, a new Wild West where the normal rules of behavior don't apply.

Review: Steven Owad has crafted a suspenseful tale of secrets and betrayal with a bit of a hard-boiled edge in Brother's Keeper.

The story opens in Poland with journalist Vince Maguire, an ex-patriate New Yorker living in Warsaw, getting a call from his brother Teddy, someone he hasn't seen or spoken to in years. Teddy will be arriving in Poland on the following day. Both excited and wary, Vince goes to the airport but instead of seeing his brother, is met by Marty Forlani, a friend of Teddy's. Marty says Teddy's been delayed and Vince reluctantly agrees to put Marty up for the night. But later that evening, Marty virtually kidnaps Vince, forcing him to participate in a botched murder attempt that leaves Marty dead instead. Fearing he'll be implicated in the crime, Vince flees Poland for Alberta, Canada, where Marty was living and where Vince believes he'll find his brother and, hopefully, answers to why he was dragged into a ruthless murder.

Brother's Keeper is a fast-paced thriller, written (at least initially) with short, clipped sentences and sentence fragments giving the plot a sense of urgency. The author fills the narrative with descriptive details and noir-ish similes painting Warsaw as cold, bleak, and gray ... not unlike Vince's life in his adopted home. The confusion that Vince feels, being part of an attempted murder gone terribly wrong, is credible yet his journalistic instincts tell him there's more, far more to this story. When Vince gets to Alberta, the descriptions of its snow-covered vastness seem to convey an image of a blank page, where the next chapter in Vince's life will be penned.

This is a very well constructed, plotted, and written novel, though there are a few points that don't quite ring true. Vince has very little cash when he leaves Poland and cannot use a credit card for fear of being tracked, yet is able to purchase airfare from Germany to Alberta, rent hotel rooms and cars, and pay for other travel expenses without difficulty. The action, or in some cases inaction, of a few of the characters seem "out-of-character" and arbitrary. And, in an ironic way, as Vince gets stronger in his convictions and manner, the writing gets weaker and loses some of its edge. But these, together with a few loose plot threads in the end, are all minor quibbles that don't detract from this exceptionally compelling novel.

Special thanks to Steven Owad for providing a copy of Brother's Keeper for this review.

Review Copyright © 2008 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved.

For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Mystery Bestsellers for January 04, 2008

Mystery BestsellersA list of the top 15 for the week ending January 04, 2008 has been posted on the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books website.

Blood Dreams by Kay Hooper
New on the list this week: Noah Bishop and the FBI Special Crimes Unit find themselves in a unique situation in Blood Dreams by Kay Hooper. Dani Justice knows about monsters. They haunt her nightmares - and her life. But she never expected to find herself doggedly on the trail of a real flesh-and-blood predator so cunning, he's eluded the best law enforcement could send up against him; so deadly, he doesn't hesitate to kill even a senator's daughter. Or a cop. Dani doesn't want to hunt this killer. She doesn't want to risk the life she's made for herself, or her hard-won peace. But she doesn't have a choice. Because his bloody rampage has hit far too close to home. Because Dani alone commands a weapon powerful enough to destroy him. And because Dani knows something even Bishop doesn't. Dani knows how the hunt ends. It ends in fire. And blood. And death. What she doesn't know is who will survive.

On our bestseller page, we've added an icon next to every title that is available for immediate download onto the Amazon Kindle. To learn about this wireless reading device, visit the Amazon Kindle page for more information.

The top four mystery bestsellers this week are depicted below:


Please visit the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books where we are committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Mystery Book Review: Mausoleum by Justin Scott

Mysterious ReviewsMysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, has written a review of Mausoleum by Justin Scott. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Mausoleum by Justin ScottBuy from Amazon.com
Mausoleum by
A Ben Abbott Mystery

Poisoned Pen Press (Hardcover)
ISBN-10: 1-59058-468-6 (1590584686)
ISBN-13: 978-1-59058-468-2 (9781590584682)
Publication Date: December 2007
List Price: $24.95

Synopsis (from the publisher): When Newbury Connecticut’s three hundred year old village cemetery is invaded by a gaudy, half-million dollar mausoleum, Ben Abbott is not happy.

Newcomer Brian Grose’s tall, wide, mirror-polished eruption of eternal ego sticks out in the peaceful burying ground like a McMansion in an apple orchard. Ben’s fellow drinkers at the bar have nicknamed the monstrosity, “McTomb.” But no one expected to find Brian’s body locked in his mausoleum, fifty years ahead of schedule.

Then Homeland Security Immigration Criminal Enforcement agents descend on Newbury hunting for Charlie Cubrero, an illegal immigrant farm hand—and supposed gang leader—who bought a gun after he was stiffed for fifty bucks by Brian Grose.

Ben Abbott doesn’t buy it. Half the town was in the graveyard celebrating Newbury’s tercentennial when Brian was shot and most of them were mad at him. Besides, Ben admires the hard working Charlie. And he fears that the news that the illegal worked for the Village Cemetery Association will destroy the venerable society already torn asunder by suing and counter-suing anti-mausoleum traditionalists and pro-mausoleum insurgents.

Review: Connecticut real estate agent Ben Abbott investigates murder in, of all places, a mausoleum in the aptly titled Mausoleum, the fifth mystery in this series by Justin Scott.

Brian Grose, a California real estate developer, has chosen rural Connecticut to be his home in retirement. One of his first acts as a resident, other than building a monstrous home to live in, is to construct a mausoleum in the local cemetery. When Grose is found shot dead inside his mausoleum, the cemetery association asks Ben to look into the murder to, as they put it, "preserve the integrity of the association." The prime suspect is an illegal alien that had been working on farms in the area, but Ben doesn't understand what motive he might have. As Ben continues his investigation, he discovers that Brian Grose was more active in his business than residents originally thought, and that his plans may have prompted someone to have him permanently retired.

Mausoleum begins with an intriguing opening premise in the form of a locked room mystery: a dead man, shot several times, is found within a sealed structure with no obvious way for a murderer to get in (or out) without being seen. During the course of Ben's investigation, he posits several theories on how one might accomplish this impossible task. But then, somewhat inexplicably, this tantalizing mystery is largely abandoned in favor of a resolution that makes the crime far more mundane. It's a bit of a let down.

(Potential spoiler alert in this paragraph.) The middle half of the book is devoted to Ben pursuing what is essentially a missing persons case. And when said missing person is located, he has nothing to do with the murder. At best, his existence is only peripheral to the solution. It's very disappointing that so much effort was expended for something that is essentially irrelevant to the story.

This is not to say that Mausoleum is not without some merit. Setting aside the endless missing persons investigation and running commentary about Homeland Security, the whodunit aspect of the murder plot is well thought out and executed. Some of the best passages in the book are of Ben's personal life. Aunt Connie is a wonderful character who is given far too little attention; Ben's relationship with her is quite special. Ben's time at home, in preparing a meal with a neighbor for example, is especially charming. And finally, the concluding chapter is both unexpected and memorable.

Despite some of the tangential and inconsequential elements of the book, Mausoleum works well as a murder mystery and in the continued development of Ben Abbott as a character in this series.

Special thanks to Poisoned Pen Press for providing an ARC of Mausoleum for this review.

Review Copyright © 2008 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved.

For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Kindle Mysteries: New Mystery Book Titles for January 2008

A list of about 40 new mystery books scheduled for publication in January 2008 and available for the , Amazon's wireless reading device, has been posted to the website.

This month's profiled Kindle title ... Back in 2001, introduced telepathic barmaid Sookie Stackhouse in Dead Until Dark, the first mystery in the Southern Vampire series, which went on to win the 2002 for Best Paperback. Ace Books is reissuing the title in this month as well as on the Kindle. The books in this series have been so popular that this fall HBO began production on True Blood, a television series based on the Southern Vampire books. Anna Paquin will star as Sookie Stackhouse. No air date has yet been announced. If you haven't yet read any of the series books, here's an opportunity to start from the beginning!

for the Kindle are generally priced between $3.99 and $9.99 and can be downloaded immediately.

currently has a list of over 250 recently published mystery book titles available on our website with more added every week.

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Mystery Bookshelf: New Paperback Mysteries for January 2008

Mystery Bookshelf: Discover a Library of New Mysteries

has updated its website to include over 50 new mass market paperback mystery books scheduled for publication in January 2008. Below is a preview of these mysteries:

Though the scheduled publication date is reported to be January for these books, actual available dates tend to be somewhat fluid with some books already on the shelves and a few not shipping until the following month.

For more information on any of these titles, please visit website. Paperback mysteries published over the past 6 months are also available for browsing, conveniently sorted by author, series character, and date.

Discover a library of new mysteries at the !

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