Wednesday, May 05, 2010

A&E Announces 2010 Schedule, including Four Crime Dramas in Development

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In a press release today, A&E announced its 2010 upfront schedule and all of its scripted series in development are crime dramas.

Previously announced is a 13-episode order for The Glades, a character-driven police procedural set in Florida that will premiere this July.

Four series plus one mini-series are under development:

Coma, a multi-night mini-series based on the medical thriller by Robin Cook, about a doctor who discovers that something sinister is going on in her hospital after routine procedures send more than a few seemingly healthy patients into comas on the operating table. The patients are then sent to an undisclosed institute where they are to be observed; sensing something is amiss, the savvy doctor realizes that their organs are being illegally harvested for profit. She must then decide who she can trust and how to stop it, before she is silenced. The production team couldn't be more stellar: Ridley Scott, Tony Scott and David W. Zucker.

Criminology, a crime drama in which Sarah O'Rourke believes that anyone is capable of anything. As a brilliant psychology professor at a small university she can reveal an individual's true motives by setting the simplest verbal traps or false pretexts to executing extravagant 'pack' experiments on the entire university body that shine a light on the machinations of our society. So when a local detective, John Acer, comes to her for help in an unsolved case, Sarah breaks down the array of evidence into a seemingly simple study of human nature, from profiling a bank robber based upon the character mask he wears to revealing the location of a serial killer by dissecting a city's social psychology. A fascinating crime procedural that exposes the truths of why we do what we do. This series is also being developed by Ridley Scott, Tony Scott and David W. Zucker.

Big Mike, which features a plus-sized detective in a world where plus-sized is a minus. He is a force of nature in the San Diego Police Department, and his co-workers know not to underestimate him. One of the best in his field, he gets things done, knows all the right people, gets along with everyone, and knows all the best places to eat, a benefit when you're patrolling for hours on an empty stomach. Big Mike can be a charging bull while serving a warrant or a gentle giant while rescuing a child from a fire. He can be profane, relentless and even deceitful when regulations stand in the way of justice, but he intimately understands both passion and human weakness, which serves as his greatest strength as a detective and his greatest challenge in his romantic life.

American Crime in which two FBI agents, one male and one female, are partnered together and sent to unusual parts of the country to work with local police and solve crimes. Their cases expose them to different cultures each week (i.e. one week an Aryan nation community, the next an upper class neighborhood in Boston). One is a former high school teacher who is driven by passion and impulse, while the other is more centered and logical. Initially, the two are reluctant partners, though they gradually develop a strong, platonic bond, learning to trust and depend on each other.

And Hazel Rhodes, featuring the titular character who might wear her concert t-shirt a little too tight and her lipstick might be two shades too bright, but she might also be the best homicide detective Nashville has ever seen. She is the antithesis of a Southern Belle, a woman who came from nothing and clamored her way to the top of her field, she'll do anything to solve her cases, even if it means busting into a men's restroom or sneaking onto a crime scene to take photos. Sharp-tongued and quick witted, no murderer is too clever for her. Unlike most murder-mysteries, the audience will see the murder each week in the teaser so it becomes a thrill ride of cat-and-mouse each week as Hazel tries to nail the criminal before it's too late.

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