Tuesday, January 26, 2010

First Clues, Mysteries for Kids: New Titles for February 2010

First Clues: Mysteries for Kids

, your source for information on over 100 mystery series for children and young adults where each series is conveniently listed under four different age categories (New Sleuths, ages 4 to 6; Future Sleuths, ages 7 to 9; Sleuths in Training, ages 10 to 12; and Apprentice Sleuths, ages 13 and older), is pleased to announce a selection of new mystery books (including series books) scheduled for publication during February 2010.

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April Adventure by Ron Roy

April Adventure by Ron Roy


The 4th book in this series of 12.

Dink, Josh, and Ruth Rose have hidden Easter eggs for the younger kids to find. Bradley, Brian, Nate, and Lucy have no trouble finding the plastic eggs. But some of the golden eggs disappear! Can the four kids track down the thief?

The books in the Calendar Mysteries are recommended for readers aged 7 to 9.

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The Viper's Nest by Peter Lerangis

The Viper's Nest by Peter Lerangis


The 7th book in this thrilling suspense and adventure series.

It's no longer a game. The body count is rising. Shaken by recent events, Amy and Dan flee to a distant land and trace the footsteps of their most formidable ancestor yet: a military leader of mythic proportions. Yet just as the siblings begin to master the art of ancient warfare, they confront a dangerous enemy that can't be felled with a sword: the truth. With the stakes higher than ever, Amy and Dan uncover something so devastating it changes everything – the secret of their family branch.

The 39 Clues books are recommended for readers aged 10 to 12.

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The White House by Roland Smith

The White House by Roland Smith


The 2nd book in this mystery series.

Another thrilling caper, this time to the White House where Q and Angela continue their quest to uncover the truth behind the supposed death of Angela's real mother -- a former Secret Service agent -- while trying to differentiate the "good guys" from the "bad guys."

The I, Q Mysteries are recommended for readers aged 10 to 12.

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Conspiracy 365 February by Gabrielle Lord

Conspiracy 365 February by Gabrielle Lord


The 2nd book in this series of thrillers.

On New Year's Eve, Callum Ormond is chased down the street by a crazed man with a deadly warning: They killed your father. They'll kill you. You must survive the next 365 days! Now he's on the run. The people who killed his father want him dead, and the police are chasing him for a crime he didn't commit. A month has gone by and he's still no nearer to solving the Ormond Riddle, the family secret that has turned his life into a nightmare. Can he trust the mysterious Winter Frey, or will she lead him further into danger? He has 334 days. The clock is ticking ...

Books in the Conspiracy 365 series are recommended for readers aged 13 and older.

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The Sixty-Eight Rooms by Marianne Malone

The Sixty-Eight Rooms by Marianne Malone
Non-series

Almost everybody who has grown up in Chicago knows about the Thorne Rooms. Housed in the Children’s Galleries of the Chicago Art Institute, they are a collection of 68 exquisitely crafted miniature rooms made in the 1930s by Mrs. James Ward Thorne. Each of the 68 rooms is designed in the style of a different historic period, and every detail is perfect, from the knobs on the doors to the candles in the candlesticks. Some might even say, the rooms are magic.

Imagine — what if you discovered a key that allowed you to shrink so that you were small enough to sneak inside and explore the rooms’ secrets? What if you discovered that others had done so before you? And that someone had left something important behind?

This book is recommended for readers aged 10 to 12.

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The Adventures of Jack Lime by James Leck

The Adventures of Jack Lime by James Leck
Non-series

Things might get rough, they might even get a little messy, but I was okay with rough and messy as long as I could shut the lid on this dirty case.

Meet Jack Lime, private investigator, who solves problems for his fellow Iona High students. Sometimes he falls for the dames who hire him, sometimes he falls in the river and sometimes he falls asleep (he’s narcoleptic). But rest assured that whether he’s tracking down a missing banana-seat bike or a kidnapped hamster, or cracking open a trivia tournament betting ring, Lime will follow every lead.

Jack Lime is a cynical sleuth who has the makings of a top-notch PI, though his personal life frequently goes awry. In these three stand-alone detective stories, readers will immerse themselves in an offbeat fictional world populated with eccentric characters where everything is not as it seems.

This book is recommended for readers aged 13 and older.

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Heist Society by Ally Carter

Heist Society by Ally Carter
Non-series

When Katarina Bishop was three, her parents took her on a trip to the Louvre ... to case it. For her seventh birthday, Katarina and her Uncle Eddie traveled to Austria ... to steal the crown jewels. When Kat turned fifteen, she planned a con of her own -- scamming her way into the best boarding school in the country, determined to leave the family business behind. Unfortunately, leaving "the life" for a normal life proves harder than she'd expected.

Soon, Kat's friend and former co-conspirator, Hale, appears out of nowhere to bring her back into the world she tried so hard to escape. But he has good reason: a powerful mobster has been robbed of his priceless art collection and wants to retrieve it. Only a master thief could have pulled this job, and Kat's father isn't just on the suspect list, he is the list. Caught between Interpol and a far more deadly enemy, Kat's dad needs her help. For Kat there is only one solution: track down the paintings and steal them back. So what if it's a spectacularly impossible job? She's got two weeks, a teenage crew, and hopefully just enough talent to pull off the biggest heist in history -- or at least her family's (very crooked) history.

This book is recommended for readers aged 13 and older.

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