Thursday, December 31, 2009

Mysterious Reviews: The Best Mysteries of 2009

Mysterious Reviews: Mysteries Reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books

It's time once again to review (as it were) the best mysteries reviewed by Mysterious Reviews during 2009. In addition to the reviews I write myself, we also have two regular contributors. To keep things simple, we'll primarily focus our attention in this post on the reviews of just one person, that being yours truly.

The year started slowly for me. Through May, I had rated only 2 books with 5 stars. But the last 7 months produced an additional 10 mysteries, suspense novels and thrillers that garnered my top rating.

Herewith are my selections as the best mysteries of 2009.

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Floodgates by Mary Anna Evans
More information about the book

Floodgates by Mary Anna Evans

I've been a fan of Mary Anna Evans' Faye Longchamp mysteries from the very beginning, one of the few series for which I've read every book. Floodgates continues her streak of excellence. What sets the series apart from its peers is the exceptionally well-developed character of Faye. Here's a quote from another character in the book that aptly describes her: "That's what I like about you, Faye. You never stop being an archaeologist. You never stop digging. And you never fail to look at facts, even when you don't like them much." These are also books that blend historical information into the murder mystery plot, in this case the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Though each book can be read as a stand-alone, start from the beginning and watch Faye grow and evolve with each succeeding story.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Floodgates by Mary Anna Evans.

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Mad Hatter's Holiday by Peter Lovesey
More information about the book

Mad Hatter's Holiday by Peter Lovesey

Soho Press is reissuing Peter Lovesey's Sergeant Cribb mysteries, and what a wonderful series this is. Originally written in the 1970s, they are a study in how richly detailed characters, setting, and plot can be developed in a relatively short novel format. Mad Hatter's Holiday is the fourth in the series, and "is so deftly plotted it isn't clear to the reader at any time what is true and what isn't, and who to believe and who not to trust." I found the ending wonderfully ambiguous, but later learned (from the author) that it wasn't intended to be so. That clarification didn't diminish the appeal of the book, which I heartily recommend.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Mad Hatter's Holiday by Peter Lovesey.

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A Darker Domain by Val McDermic
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A Darker Domain by Val McDermic

Val McDermid introduced a police detective who definitely deserves her own series in A Darker Domain. Though basically a cold case investigation for Fife Detective Inspector Karen Pirie, the plot deftly shifts between two cases, one current, eventually linking them in unexpected ways. Pirie is a character I wanted to get to know better, and I was ever so slightly disappointed that the book seems to be a stand-alone. Still, "the meticulously drawn characters and the intricately developed plot to the superbly written narrative" elevate this novel into the top echelon of police procedurals.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: A Darker Domain by Val McDermic.

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The Samaritan's Secret by Matt Beynon Rees
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The Samaritan's Secret by Matt Beynon Rees

Matt Beynon Rees' third Omar Yussef mystery, The Samaritan's Secret, puts the teacher and historian in a seemingly untenable situation: solve the senseless murder of a young man who may be responsible for the loss of millions of dollars of Palestinian money and prevent the World Bank from cutting off additional funds to the Palestinian people, all in three days. What I found most interesting about the story is how Omar elects to pursue his investigation. As I wrote in my review, "Omar Yussef initially overlooks some of the obvious, but highly improbable, solutions to the murder mystery in favor of the more expedient, if less practical, ones." As a reader, I kept wanting to tap Omar on the shoulder and tell him he's approaching the problem from the wrong perspective. That the story drew me in so completely is a mark of an outstanding mystery.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: The Samaritan's Secret by Matt Beynon Rees.

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Hard Stop by Chris Knopf
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Hard Stop by Chris Knopf

I am in awe of how Chris Knopf writes, the way he constructs his sentences, their cadence, the words he uses in them and the images and feelings they evoke in both the characters and the reader. It is sheer joy reading his work, and his novel Hard Stop is yet another example in his Sam Acquillo series. Here's a short sample taken from a longer passage I included in my review, one from which the title is taken: "No willful murder is justified, but hers felt less like an act of butchery than a surgical elimination. A tactical execution. Maybe that's all it was, a simple transaction. A line item on a profit and loss statement. Case closed. Meeting over. The ultimate hard stop." So much can be inferred about the characters, the plot, and the overall pacing of the story from just these few sentences. Truly remarkable.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Hard Stop by Chris Knopf.

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Wife of the Gods by Kwei Quartey
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Wife of the Gods by Kwei Quartey

Mysteries set in Africa seem to be in vogue lately, but I found Kwei Quartey's debut novel featuring Ghanian Detective Inspector Darko Dawson, Wife of the Gods to be particularly rewarding. I wrote that the book "is written with a quiet elegance, often lyrical in its narrative. Sound actually plays an important part of the story, Dawson having a particular affinity for distinguishing subtle variations in speech patterns." The local customs and beliefs play a part in the mystery plot, the author seamlessly incorporating cultural references in a natural manner. It's terrific debut, and a series worth watching.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Wife of the Gods by Kwei Quartey.

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The Lord of Death by Eliot Pattison
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The Lord of Death by Eliot Pattison

Eliot Pattison is another author whose wordcraft enthralls me. In the sixth Shan Tao Yun mystery, The Lord of Death, "Pattison takes a fairly simple plot outline and develops the most extraordinary story around it, one that captures the reader's imagination. He's a master not only with words but with imagery." Not unlike Rees' Palestinian mysteries, Pattison subtly weaves modern politics into his story, here with Chinese policies juxtapositioned against the ancient ways and beliefs of the native Tibetans. The books in this series aren't fast-reading, nor should they be; rather, they should be savored for their richness and depth.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: The Lord of Death by Eliot Pattison.

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Jump by Tim Maleeny
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Jump by Tim Maleeny

"Entertaining" is one of those words that gets overused in reviews, possibly because it's used so broadly and can mean almost anything. But it is probably the best word to use for Tim Maleeny's stand-alone thriller Jump. Start to finish, I was absolutely and utterly entertained, "... from an extraordinary cast of characters to Maleeny's rapid-fire narrative style to a deftly plotted story that has a familiar ring to it yet feels uncommonly new." This is one novel I'll fondly remember for a very long time. And though I pined for a sequel in my review, it would be hard to improve on the perfect mix of character, setting, humor and thrill that is this book.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Jump by Tim Maleeny.

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Killer Summer by Ridley Pearson
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Killer Summer by Ridley Pearson

I had never read any of Ridley Pearson's novels before, and clearly didn't realize what I was missing. As I mentioned in my review of his third Walt Fleming thriller, "sometimes a mystery's plot, characters, inter-character relationships, setting, narrative, and dialogue all come together in perfect harmony to produce an exceptional novel; Killer Summer is one such novel." No book is flawless, but this one comes pretty close; thriller fans will find something to their liking here, from the twisty plot to the vividly drawn characters and setting to the thrill (as it were) of the chase.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Killer Summer by Ridley Pearson.

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Breathing Water by Timothy Hallinan
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Breathing Water by Timothy Hallinan

As I wrote in my review of Tim Hallinan's third Bangkok thriller, "The thrill in reading Breathing Water comes from the subtle, but relentless, escalation of tension in the story. A number of unexpected plot points, including Pan's apparent sudden change of heart with regard to the biography, keep the reader wary." I like being kept off-guard while reading a suspense novel, not knowing what will happen next. The book is also a bit unusual in that it isn't a typical thriller: there are no killers to search for or crimes to investigate; rather it is "an exceptionally compelling novel of a man caught up in a sequences of events that are spiraling out of control for everyone involved ... with little chance that anyone can come out unscathed."

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Breathing Water by Timothy Hallinan.

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The Hidden Man by David Ellis
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The Hidden Man by David Ellis

Edgar Award-winning author David Ellis introduces his first series character, attorney Jason Kolarich, in the elegantly crafted The Hidden Man, a novel I said was in the "top tier of legal thrillers." Here the book's principal strength is in its plotting: "The twists the case takes are unexpected, the misdirection subtly introduced, and the conclusion brilliantly conceived." I admit I'm not much into backstories, and there are a few too many of them here, but they aren't so distracting that my overall enthusiam for the book is tempered in any way.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: The Hidden Man by David Ellis.

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Bad Things Happen by Harry Dolan
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Bad Things Happen by Harry Dolan

And finally, my selection of the best of the best: Harry Dolan's extraordinary debut novel, Bad Things Happen. I was completely taken in from the first page when the principal character is described as the "man who calls himself David Loogan." Who is this guy? In my review I asked, "What role is he playing in the book? Is he a culprit (and if so, of what), or is he a victim?" Yes, it's a murder mystery but the plot is delightfully intricate, a cat-and-mouse game played out on several levels; the conclusion elegantly clever. While I strongly recommend each of the books on my list of the best mysteries of 2009, if you can read only one, this should be it.

Read my complete review at Mysterious Reviews: Bad Things Happen by Harry Dolan.

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For more visit Mysterious Reviews, a partner with the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books which is committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Games of Mystery: Dark Tales, Edgar Allan Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue Standard Edition, New from Big Fish Games

Games of Mystery

, your source for mystery-themed video, electronic and board games, parties for kids and adults, and murder mystery weekends and mystery getaway vacations, is pleased to announce the availability of a new mystery casual game from Big Fish Games released today. You can find out more about these games by visiting our page or by clicking on the links provided below.

Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murder in the Rue Morgue
Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murder in the Rue Morgue

A dreadful murder and kidnapping has occurred in the Rue Morgue and only you can solve the dark crime! Follow the clues to find the killer and the missing family. Become the apprentice of the famed C. Auguste Dupin and solve the devious puzzles to find the hidden clues that will lead you to the monstrous murderer. Based on Edgar Allan Poe’s most acclaimed murder mystery, Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe’s Murder in the Rue Morgue is a fantastic hidden object adventure game full of suspense and excitement.

Also available: Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murder in the Rue Morgue Strategy Guide and Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murder in the Rue Morgue Game Walkthrough.

For a more in-depth playing experience, see Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue Collector's Edition.

Dark Tales: Edgar Allan Poe's Murder in the Rue Morgue, a Big Fish Games exclusive, may be downloaded and purchased for $6.99 with a Big Fish Game Club membership. A demonstration version (213.21 MB) may be downloaded and played for free for one hour.

Watch a preview video below:

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Get any standard game for $6.99 with a Big Fish Game Club membership. Other benefits include the $2.99 Daily Deal, Tomorrow's Game Today, and special member rewards. And if you purchase any 6 games within a single month, you earn a free game with the Big Fish Game Club Monthly Punch Card!

Read our new game reviews by Ms. Terri: , , , , and .

Big Fish Games: Bestsellers

Big Fish Games: New releases

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And don't forget to visit for all kinds of mysterious fun!

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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

New Hardcover Mysteries for January 2010

The Hidden Staircase Mystery Books has updated its list of with books scheduled for publication in January 2010. Please note that some titles may publish early (and may already be available) and some may be delayed, published at a later date.

Below we're listing those authors with returning series characters, new series characters, and non-series or stand-alone mysteries in separate sections. All titles are available on our page.

• Authors with mysteries featuring returning series characters (in parentheses) this month:

New Mysteries for January 2010

(Hamish Macbeth), (Sonchai Jitpleecheep), (Dixie Hemingway), Robert Ludlum and James Cobb (Covert One), (Charlotte LaRue), (Joe Pike), (Karen Pelletier), (Mario Silva), (Fools' Guild), (Thorn), (Bill Slider), (Jack Caffery), (Arly Hanks), Jack Higgins (Sean Dillon), Kay Hooper (Blood Trilogy), Bill James (Harpur and Iles), Stuart M. Kaminsky (Inspector Rostnikov), (Hunt Club), Robert McCammon (Matthew Corbett), Keith McCarthy (John Eisenmenger and Helena Flemming), (Zack Chasteen), (Ben Geller), (Charlie Hood), (Chet and Bernie), Matthew Reilly (Jack West Jr.), (Lord Edward Corinth and Verity Browne), (Andreas Kaldis), (Ian Rutledge), (Stone Barrington), and (Peter Winslow).

• Authors with mysteries introducing new series characters (in parentheses) this month:

(Mercy Gunderson), (Jack Susko), (Stacey Curtis, Ski Diva), (Ruth Galloway), (Ray Johnson), (Jackie Swaitowski), Steven Savile (Ogmios Team), and (Kari Vaara).

• Authors with non-series or stand-alone mysteries this month:

Paul Adam, , , , David Bishop, , , , with Erin Healy, Jackie Griffey, , , , , Patricia MacDonald, Annette Mahon, , Joyce Carol Oates, Douglas Preston, James Rollins, , , , , and Peter Turnbull.

For more information on any of these titles, please visit the page on our website. If you're interested in new paperbacks, visit where you can discover a library of new mysteries, also updated with January 2010 releases.

Please visit the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books where we are committed to providing readers and collectors of with the best and most current information about their favorite authors, titles, and series.

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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Mystery Book Review: Chinese Whispers by Peter May

Mysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, is publishing a new review of Chinese Whispers by Peter May. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Chinese Whispers by Peter May

by
A Li Yan and Margaret Campbell Mystery

Poisoned Pen Press (Hardcover)
ISBN-10: 1-59058-608-5 (1590586085)
ISBN-13: 978-1-59058-608-2 (9781590586082)
Publication Date: October 2009
List Price: $24.95

Review: Is the ghost of Jack the Ripper stalking the young women on the streets of Beijing? Or is it the work of an earthly, demented mind? Peter May has written yet another page turner, Chinese Whispers, which is the sixth in his China Thriller Series. Note, The Runner is the fifth book in this series, but is not slated for release by Poisoned Pen Press until February of 2010.

Set in Beijing, China, we learn that Dr. Margaret Campbell and Li Yan are now the parents of an infant son, Li Jon. Margaret has gone from the cutting edge of being the Chief Medical Examiner of the third largest county in the United States to a frustrated, full-time stay at home mom. She is unable to perform autopsies since she is an American on Chinese soil. Her husband Li is now Section One Chief of Criminal Investigation in the Beijing Police Department. A “Jack the Ripper” copycat killer is on the loose, and Li must catch the Beijing Ripper before another innocent young woman dies. His only clue is the butt of a cheroot, left at the scene of each crime.

Professor Pan, an American, is the next victim, or so they think. The autopsy is done by Dr. Campbell, and the DNA found on the cheroot does not match the DNA found the cheroots left at the previous scenes. Then, his son Li Jon is briefly kidnapped, but found unharmed with a note from the Ripper addressed to Li. Li starts to feel that the Beijing Ripper has a personal vendetta against him. He also begins to suspect that someone in the police department is the killer, but he is fired from his job before he can finish his investigation. Who can Li trust? Will Li be able to catch the Beijing Ripper and save more women without the resources of the Beijing Police Department?

Chinese Whispers was a riveting mystery; it kept me in suspense until the end. This story focused on Li Yan and his role in the investigation while Dr. Campbell had less importance in the story. Her relegation to the background is just a metaphor for the frustration Margaret feels about her current role and purpose in life as a mother to Li Jon. However, she is called upon to do the autopsy of Dr. Pan, because both are American citizens. Margaret is also instrumental in helping Li catch the Ripper. I would give this mystery a 4½ out of 5 stars. My only complaint is that Margaret did not have more of a key role in the novel. I also recommend that you wait to read The Runner first, before reading Chinese Whispers.

Special thanks to Ruth Miller for contributing her review of Chinese Whispers and to Poisoned Pen Press for providing an ARC of the book for this review.

Review Copyright © 2009 — Ruth Miller — All Rights Reserved — Reprinted with Permission

Buy from Amazon.com

If you are interested in purchasing Chinese Whispers from Amazon.com, please click the button to the right.

Synopsis (from the publisher): His victims are young, beautiful and viciously mutilated. He calls himself the Beijing Ripper. The media and terror-sticken public are demanding the arrest of the Beijing Ripper and Li Yan, the head of Beijing's serious crime squad, has been put in the spotlight. American pathologist Margaret Campbell is invited to perform an autopsy on one of the victims and her results send shockwaves through the investigation. Then Li begins receiving personal letters from the killer, and his life and career start falling apart. The need to uncover the Ripper's identity becomes paramount if he is to save himself and his family. Peter May's terrifying new China thriller pits Li Yan and Margaret Campbell against an unscrupulous foe who could prove to be their deadliest enemy yet.

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Money Shot by Christa Faust Optioned for Film; Author to Pen Screenplay

Christa Faust: Money Shot
More information about the book

Earlier this month, Publishers Marketplace reported that Christa Faust's pulp novel Money Shot had been optioned to producer Daniel Ostroff (The Missing) with Jim Sonzero to direct and the author adapting. Today, Crimespree Cinema has more information about the adaptation, including an interview with the author.

Though Faust has a number of film tie-in novels to her credit, this is her first screenplay. "First of all," she says, "I quickly discovered that some things work perfectly well in prose, but not so well in a more visual medium. Second, while novel writing is a mostly solitary job, films are much more collaborative. Each person involved brings their own input and ideas to the table and so it's important to be able to work together as a team."

About Money Shot: It all began with the phone call asking former porn star Angel Dare to do one more movie. Before she knew it, she’d been shot and left for dead in the trunk of a car. But Angel is a survivor. And that means she’ll get to the bottom of what’s been done to her even if she has to leave a trail of bodies along the way ...

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Monday, December 28, 2009

Mystery Book Review: Holiday Grind by Cleo Coyle

Mysterious Reviews, mysteries reviewed by the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, is publishing a new review of Holiday Grind by Cleo Coyle. For our blog readers, we are printing it first here in advance of its publication on our website.

Holiday Grind by Cleo Coyle

by
A Coffeehouse Mystery with Clare Cosi

Berkley Prime Crime (Hardcover)
ISBN-10: 0-425-23005-8 (0425230058)
ISBN-13: 978-0-425-23005-3 (9780425230053)
Publication Date: November 2009
List Price: $23.95

Review: Greenwich Village coffeeshop owner Clare Cosi discovers the murdered body of the father of one of her baristas, who acts as a local Santa during the holiday season, in Holiday Grind, the 8th mystery in this series by Cleo Coyle.

Clare is hosting a small gathering of family and friends to try out some new holiday-themed recipes the night she finds Alf Glockner shot to death. The police believe the murder to be a random mugging, someone out for the money "Santa" was collecting from donors. Clare isn't so sure, but her boyfriend, homicide detective Mike Quinn, is preoccupied with his own high-profile murder investigation. So she starts her own line of inquiry into the life of a man she thought she knew, but really didn't, and that quickly includes two other murders and ultimately a threat to her own family.

Holiday Grind is a charming addition to this cozy series, incorporating elements of the holiday season into its mystery storyline. Though it is far too long to support the relatively thin plot, the delightful characters and Manhattan setting tend to compensate. The book also includes a generous collection of enticing coffee drink and holiday recipes for readers to try at home, and tips from the (fictional) Village Blend coffeeshop.

Special thanks to Penguin Group for providing a copy of Holiday Grind for this review.

Review Copyright © 2009 — Hidden Staircase Mystery Books — All Rights Reserved

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If you are interested in purchasing Holiday Grind from Amazon.com, please click the button to the right.

Synopsis (from the publisher): There's nothing cozier than a winter evening in Greenwich Village. Streetlights shimmer through icy flakes, caf├ęs glow with welcoming warmth, and a layer of snow dusts historic townhouses like powdered sugar on holiday confections. Murder has no place in such a pretty picture, until now ...

Coffeehouse manager Clare Cosi has grown very fond of Alfred Glockner, the part-time comic and genuinely jolly charity Santa who's been using her Village Blend as a place to warm his mittens. When she finds him brutally gunned down in a nearby alley, a few subtle clues convince her that Alfred's death was something more than the tragic result of a random mugging--the conclusion of the police. With Clare's boyfriend, NYPD Detective Mike Quinn, distracted by a cold case of his own, and ex-husband Matt investigating this year's holiday lingerie catalogs (an annual event), Clare charges ahead solo to solve her beloved Santa's slaying. Then someone tries to ice Clare, and she really gets steamed. But she'd better watch out, because if she fails to stop this stone cold killer, she may just get the biggest chill of her life.

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Mystery Godoku Puzzle for December 28, 2009

A new has been created by the editors of the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books and is now available on our website.

Godoku is similar to Sudoku, but uses letters instead of numbers. To give you a headstart, we provide you a mystery clue to fill in a complete row or column (if you choose to use it!).

Mystery Godoku Puzzle for December 28, 2009

This week's letters and mystery clue:

A D E L N O R S U

He edited the alternate history and crime fiction anthology Sideways in Crime (9 letters).

We now have two weeks of our puzzles on one page in PDF format for easier printing. Print this week's puzzle here.

Previous puzzles are stored in the Mystery Godoku Archives.

Enjoy the weekly Mystery Godoku Puzzle from the Hidden Staircase Mystery Books, and Thanks for visiting our website!

   

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Sunday, December 27, 2009

Mysteries on TV: Thin Ice, a Jesse Stone Mystery, Airs Tonight on CBS

Jesse Stone: Thin Ice (CBS)

This evening, Sunday December 27th, Tom Selleck reprises his role as Jesse Stone in the fifth installment of the Jesse Stone franchise Thin Ice on CBS. The made-for-television movie is based on the best-selling series of books by Robert B. Parker, and originally aired in March 2009.

In Jesse Stone: Thin Ice, Paradise (MA) Police Chief Jesse Stone finds himself in trouble with the Town Council when he inadvertently becomes involved in a shoot-out on a Boston street. His friend, State Homicide Commander Healy, is seriously wounded and Jesse comes under investigation by the Boston Police Department's Internal Affairs Division, which causes him to be away from Paradise for extended periods of time. Jesse further alienates the Council by firing the Paradise Police Department's most prodigious ticket writer, resulting in a considerable loss of revenue for the town. His issues with the Council are further exacerbated when a celebrated out-of-towner shows up in Paradise in search of her missing child, and Jesse agrees to take her case. His continued defiance of the Council's wishes now begins to jeopardize his very job.

The sixth film of the series, No Remorse, was completed in November 2008, but (to the frustration of the series fans) CBS has yet to schedule an air date. The seventh in the series, Innocents Lost, wrapped up filming in Nova Scotia last month and is presumably currently in post-production.

The first five movies are available on DVD from Mysteries on TV: Jesse Stone.

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First Clues, Mysteries for Kids: A Hardy Boys Title for January 2010

First Clues: Mysteries for Kids

is your source for information on over 100 mystery series for children and young adults where each series is conveniently listed under four different age categories (New Sleuths, ages 4 to 6; Future Sleuths, ages 7 to 9; Sleuths in Training, ages 10 to 12, and Apprentice Sleuths, ages 13 and older), is pleased to announce a new Hardy Boys series book that is scheduled for publication during January 2010.

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Private Killer by Franklin W. Dixon

Private Killer by Franklin W. Dixon


The 2nd book in the "Killer" trilogy.

Mission: To find out more about the dangerous, recently uncovered secret society at Willis Firth Academy.

Location: The Academy is an exclusive private school in New England.

Potential Victims: Destiny Darity, the headmaster's meddlesome, troublemaking daughter -- and anyone who might be close to her!

Suspects: All members of Gamma Theta Theta, and the secret society within it. Not to mention some of the faculty who seem to stop at nothing to keep Firth out of the public eye ...

The Hardy Boys mysteries are recommended for readers aged 10 and older.

— ◊ —

In other Hardy Boys news, Simon & Schuster will be debuting a new series in 2010 featuring 9- and 8-year-old Frank and Joe Hardy in the Secret Files mysteries. The first two books, Trouble at the Arcade and The Missing Mitt, are scheduled to be published in April. We'll have more information about the series soon!

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Games of Mystery: Agatha Christie's Dead Man's Folly, New at Big Fish Games

Games of Mystery

, your source for mystery-themed video, electronic and board games, parties for kids and adults, and murder mystery weekends and mystery getaway vacations, is pleased to announce the availability of a new mystery casual game from Big Fish Games released today. You can find out more about these games by visiting our page or by clicking on the links provided below.

Agatha Christie: Dead Man's Folly
Agatha Christie: Dead Man's Folly

As a guest at the beautiful Nasse House, you are invited to take part in a thrilling mock-murder game. While visitors follow clues to find the killer, those in charge find themselves with a rising sense of uncertainty. Join famed detective Hercule Poirot as you discover that this charade could be the perfect disguise for a devious criminal! Find hidden clues, decode messages and solve puzzles through 48 challenging seek-and-find levels and 15 gorgeous locations to reveal the truth behind a most despicable scheme.

See also the first two games in the series, Agatha Christie: Death on the Nile and Agatha Christie: Peril at End House.

Agatha Christie: Dead Man's Folly may be downloaded and purchased for $6.99 with a Big Fish Game Club membership. A demonstration version (38.85 MB) may be downloaded and played for free for one hour.

Watch a preview video below:

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Get any game for $6.99 with a Big Fish Game Club membership. Other benefits include the $2.99 Daily Deal, Tomorrow's Game Today, and special member rewards. And if you purchase any 6 games within a single month, you earn a free game with the Big Fish Game Club Monthly Punch Card!

Read our new game reviews by Ms. Terri: , , , , and .

Big Fish Games: Bestsellers

Big Fish Games: New releases

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And don't forget to visit for all kinds of mysterious fun!

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Lance Wright owns and manages Omnimystery, a Family of Mystery Websites, which had its origin as Hidden Staircase Mystery Books in 1986. As the scope of the business expanded, first into book reviews — Mysterious Reviews — and later into information for and reviews of mystery and suspense television and film, all sites were consolidated under the Omnimystery brand in 2006.

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